2015/01/26

Condé Nast is enlisting its editors to consult with advertisers and help them create articles and images

AdAge :: Glossy magazine publisher Conde Nast, which owns Vogue and Vanity Fair, is enlisting its editors to consult with advertisers and help them create articles and images.

Read Michael Sebastian, adage.com

To avoid being banned throughout Turkey, Facebook has blocked Turkish users’ access to a number of pages

New York Times :: To avoid being banned throughout Turkey, Facebook has blocked Turkish users’ access to a number of pages containing content that the authorities had deemed insulting to the Prophet Muhammad.

Read Sebnem Arsu, Mark Scott, www.nytimes.com

Publishers sour on traffic-based bonuses

Digiday :: With Gawker and Vox Media, the idea of rewarding writers based on traffic is attracting some high-profile detractors.

Read Ricardo Bilton, digiday.com

The UK mobilizes vs. ad fraud

Digiday :: Ad fraud is the drunk guest at the programmatic party whom everybody wants to leave but nobody’s quite sure how to make sure he does.

Read Chris Smith, digiday.com

Why Vox Media makes content just for social media

Digiday :: Facebook isn't sharing native-video revenue with publishers yet. But when it does, Vox Media plans to be ready, with content that’s designed to live only on social platforms.

Read Lucia Moses, digiday.com

Official NFL highlights are coming to YouTube and Google search results

The Verge :: You'll be able to stream Super Bowl XLIX online for free next weekend, but it won't be the only place you'll be able to watch official footage of the game. Google has agreed a deal with the National Football League to show highlights on YouTube, creating an official NFL channel on the video site a month after it signed off on a similar deal with Facebook.

Read Rich McCormick, www.theverge.com

2015/01/25

BBC Arabic head Tarik Kafala on the channel's increasing significance in the modern world

Independent.co.uk :: With the Middle East in a state of perpetual unrest following the Arab Spring, a new king on the Saudi throne and the Charlie Hebdo attacks convulsing Europe, the significance of BBC Arabic, the oldest and largest of the BBC’s non-English language services, has risen, along with its global audience.

Read Adam Sherwin, www.independent.co.uk

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